wytchprincess:

daughter. Get off the blue website. you have not left your room all day it is time for dinner. i’ve got some “feels” for you: they’re called pork chops and your mother made them with love

robinwdavey:

I like scotch eggs, and I cannot lie.

robinwdavey:

I like scotch eggs, and I cannot lie.

jedjustis:

devildoll:

here we have a picture of a majestic national treasure and the Washington Monument

Mia Wasikowska photographed by Craig McDean for AnOther Magazine S/S 2014

sararye:

every 1st september we joke about getting ready for hogwarts to cover up the very real and very very deep scars of never getting our letters

mulberry-cookies:

Schiaparelli Fall 2014 Haute Couture (details)

officialhotbabe:

the official twitter icon of stolen text posts

image

feytaline-loves:

fuckyeahpaganism:

In Irish mythology, the Púca is a mischievous, shapeshifting faerie who would assume a disguise in many forms, including a horse, rabbit, goat, goblin, dog, calf, or donkey. Most commonly, the Púca is disguised as a sleek, black horse, with burning yellow eyes and an untamed, wild mane. It is among the most frightening Faeries is some parts of Ireland, and is said to scatter livestock, break fences, and cause damage to property as well as harm humans. Although It seems to have a bad reputation, If they acquire a liking to a certain human, they will often offer advice and be a generally kind faerie. The origins of the Púca is unknown, but there is some speculation that the name could have origins in Scandinavia, the name being related to “pook” or “puke” meaning “nature spirit”. 

Illustration from the classic, wonderful book Faeries by Alan Lee & Brian Froud. I love it. This is one of my favorite pages!

rumlow:

you attack captain america you attack me 

asian:

The sunset was beautiful today